Impossible Facebook and the Future of Social Media

Posted by Dr. James Canton on May 30, 2012 under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

Impossible to imagine that a billion dollar revenue based company that dominates social media and has over 900 million users has to endure all of this huge diversionary mirage about the dysfunction of their public offering. Whew!! There I said it.

Common wisdom is that drop in value has something to do with Facebook’s S1 public offering disclosures, their lack of desire to actually make money (please, does anyone actually believe this?). I cannot think that anything is farther from reality.

Facebook is developing, and I do mean developing a disruptive new business model that puts a value on connections, relationships, networks of communities. Over $1 million per 900 million. Over $3 Million per business. This is a new, yet to be proven business model.

So the fast R/evolution of web business is hard to see in real time. Microsoft dominated the desktop, Google blew up advertising, Apple conquered the apps world and now Facebook is a mega disruptor all over again dominating social media. This doesn’t mean there is lots of room in the business ecosystem for Twitter, Linked In, and others to play in the huge global web connected marketplace. Plenty of dinero. Plenty of time to grow new innovations with a long tail.

So back to Facebook. Impossible Facebook. Can they meet the mobile web challenge learning from Apple? Can they monetize advertising like Google has? I think they can and they can co-compete with other players.

Keep in mind that to 900 people today and over two billion people tomorrow, within five years, Facebook will be the Web for most people. Search, communicate, transact, locate and share all via Facebook.

So do I care that the stock is dropping? Or the valuation is questionable? No. This is a billion dollar company just growing up. Give it time, while your on Facebook or off Liking this or that.

Let’s let Mark show us what he can do. I bet he is a closet data scientist that has big plans for big analytics, big data and has a vision of the future of social media, maybe even the future of society and business.

Impossible Facebook is a fulcrum of change, electrifying the now and maybe the future of social media. Give them time to stretch and grow.

Steve Jobs’s Innovation Leadership at Apple: My Lessons Learned

Posted by Dr. James Canton on August 25, 2011 under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

Steve Jobs is leaving Apple in great shape. His is exiting as CEO to retain the chairman position but leaves behind a innovation leadership legacy that is transformational. There is no leader in modern times that was more innovative, that broke more rules and invented more things that have transformed our world.

I worked at Apple headquarters in Silicon Valley in 1984 and was part of the team that launched the Macintosh computer. I worked in business strategy, strategic planning and managed global business markets, verticals like medicine were my passion and focus. I gave the first Mac’s to doctors and the National Institutes for Health for doing medical research on finding cures for kidney disease.

These were heady times. We knew we were igniting a revolution in how people used computing, information and culture. The Mac challenged that very idea of what a computer could be. Steve first evangelized the Mac to us, the employees well before he sold the world.

Lesson #1 Every Leader Must Be the Chief Evangelist
You have to sell the Big Vision first to your employees. If they don’t get it then customer will never. This seems obvious but too many leaders today have the right financial chops or seniority or even board support but don’t embody this lesson. Steve invented it.

Days before the Mac launch we sent around pictures of a Swiss Army knife, challenging ourselves that Mac was something else, not just a computer but a lifestyle appliance. Steve challenged us to think about the Mac as more then just a technology–it was a innovation in culture, lifestyle and learning.

Lesson #2 Think Different To Differentiate Your Company or Product

Steve was all about being innovative in marketing, product features, design, packaging, purpose—he knew that thinking differently was the key to differentiating Apple from the crowd of MeTo companies.

When we launched the Mac to the media and analysts we put a Mac in every room, with no manual. Other computers, like IBM came with huge manuals on how to operate. When the analysts came into their rooms we expected and they did touch the computer. The Mac would turn on and they would hear from the computer HELLO. This blew their mind. Steve was always blowing our minds with innovation ideas.
Lesson #3 Take Smart Risks, Fail Fast and Don’t Give Up
People forget that Apple tried and failed at many things before succeeding. You learn more from mistakes then successes. Edison’s light bulb took 40,000 mistakes to get it right. Before the Mac computer the Lisa failed. Apple had a run at a at an early iPad called Newton, it did not make it. Taking risks and persevering is important.

Lesson #4 Enjoy the Journey

We all are here on the planet for a limited window. Make the most of it.
Steve would remind us all that you have to enjoy the journey. Or don’t do it. He challenged us all to make a commitment to ourselves to do something big, important and meaningful. These lessons are as true today as in 1984.

Lesson #5 Invent the Future

This is the big one. Being bold, being future-ready, this is what life and business is all about. If your going to invent the future you have to be willing to brake rules, take risks, make mistakes but most important–Think Big Ideas. Selling your big idea your innovation is what every leader needs to do everyday. Steve was and is a fearless leader who invented the future: Mac, iPod, iPad, ITunes, Apple TV, the mouse… and a software interface that everyone has adopted for 20 years.

We wish Steve well in his next chapter and thank him for the lessons learned. I know his next innovations he will inspire at Apple will continue to touch us all.

Steve Jobs’s Innovation Leadership at Apple: My Lessons Learned

Posted by Dr. James Canton on under Uncategorized | Read the First Comment

Steve Jobs is leaving Apple as CEO in great shape. His is exiting as CEO to retain the chairman position but leaves behind an innovation leadership legacy that is transformational. I expect as I serve on boards of companies that he too will look to continue to inspire.  There is no leader in modern times that was more innovative, that broke more rules and invented more things that have transformed our world. Think about it: Apple, Disney, Pixar… Steve has been at the leading edge of transforming computing, entertainment, music, animation, software, platforms…I have a feeling he is not done but taking a break.

I worked at Apple headquarters in Silicon Valley in 1984 and was part of the team that launched the Macintosh computer. I worked in business strategy, strategic planning and managed global business markets, verticals like medicine were my passion and focus. I gave the first Mac’s to doctors and the National Institutes for Health for doing medical research on finding cures for kidney disease.

I learned much from working at Apple about innovation, markets and customers. Most of all what I learned from Steve was about an unrelenting furious passion and commitment to your vision of the future. This example has contributed to my success as a futurist in helping my clients think about, plan for and execute future strategies in business and government.

These were heady times. We knew we were igniting a revolution in how people used computing, information and culture. The Mac challenged that very idea of what a computer could be. Steve first evangelized the Mac to us, the employees, well before he sold the world.

Lesson #1 Every Leader Must Be the Chief Evangelist
You have to sell the Big Vision first to your employees. If they don’t get it then customers will never. This seems obvious but too many leaders today have the right financial chops or seniority or even board support but don’t embody this lesson. Steve invented it. Yes, it matters big.

Days before the Mac launch we sent around pictures of a Swiss Army knife, challenging ourselves that Mac was something else, not just a computer but a lifestyle appliance. Steve challenged us to think about the Mac as more then just a technology–it was an innovation in culture, lifestyle and learning.

Lesson #2 Think Different To Differentiate Your Company or Product

Steve was all about being innovative in marketing, product features, design, packaging, purpose—he knew that thinking differently was the key to differentiating Apple from the crowd of MeTo companies.

When we launched the Mac to the media and analysts we put a Mac in every room, with no manual. Other computers, like IBM came with huge manuals on how to operate. When the analysts came into their rooms we expected, and they did touch the computer. The Mac would turn on and they would hear from the computer HELLO. This blew their minds. Steve was always blowing our minds with innovation ideas.
Lesson #3 Take Smart Risks, Fail Fast and Don’t Give Up
People forget that Apple tried and failed at many things before succeeding. You learn more from mistakes then successes. Edison’s light bulb took 40,000 mistakes to get it right. Before the Mac computer the Lisa failed. Apple had a run at a an early iPad called Newton, it did not make it. Taking risks and persevering is important. What are you willing to fight for now?

Lesson #4 Enjoy the Journey

We all are here on the planet for a limited window. Make the most of it.
Steve would remind us all that you have to enjoy the journey. Or don’t do it. He challenged us all to make a commitment to ourselves to do something big, important and meaningful. These lessons are as true today as in 1984.

Lesson #5 Invent the Future

This is the big one. Being bold, being future-ready, this is what life and business is all about. If your going to invent the future you have to be willing to brake rules, take risks, make mistakes but most important–Think Big Ideas. Selling your big idea, your innovation is what every leader needs to do everyday. Steve was and is a fearless leader who invented the future: Mac, iPod, iPad, ITunes, Apple TV, the mouse… and a software interface that everyone has adopted for 20 years.

We wish Steve well in his next chapter and thank him for the lessons learned. I know his next innovations he will inspire at Apple will continue to touch us all.

The Semantic Web Show: Future of the Internet is Mining Desire?

Posted by Dr. James Canton on June 8, 2011 under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

Hanging out at the Semantic Web show http://semtech2011.semanticweb.com/index.cfm
in SF yesterday with Sandy Rosenberg, an IGF adviser made me realize how early we are in understanding the semantic web. The show was intimate and eye opening regarding the powerful potential for this technology.

Simply put, the Semantic Web is about tagging everything and linking every data, audio, image and video source to everything–including us. Also context pattern recognition–finding insight into data that is useful.

Then better search emerges, smarter analytics emerge and maybe we understand how to sell, profit, serve and help people better in everything we do–from health care to security to making new drugs and finding new customers.

The Semantic Web will either be a boon to business or a huge intrusion into life by forces that want to mine and predict your desires. You may say what’s wrong with mining my desires? If you have to ask you missed it.

Personally I think a super computing AI, think Google in the near future with the power of predictive analytic media, seductive, immersive, intuitive, sensing your Desires and then enabling your desires for information, products, services, experiences to be fulfilled sounds both fantastic and disturbing at the same time.

Are not happy in the Matrix? OK maybe that’s too much. But someone in a very undemocratic place like Iran or North Korea may use this Rogue Technology to exploit our desires in ways not happy.

Think neuromarketing meets social media meets the semantic web. Who will watch the watchers? In the manufacture of desire be careful what you ask for.

I do think the semantic web also and primarily will drive valuable new services in media entertainment and health care, to name a few.

See Semantic Web Show in SF, well done event
http://semtech2011.semanticweb.com/index.cfm

U2 Concert in Oakland CA: Future of Innovation Velocity

Posted by Dr. James Canton on under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

The most interesting thing about the U2 concert last night in Oakland was not Bono’s call to action for human rights in Burma or his crazy robust voice banging out all the songs we love. It was the real time (maybe) feed from space the last Endeavor space station of our Astronaut beaming in reminding us that it takes only one of us to with imagination to change the world for the better.

Very cool reminder, from space that tech innovations transform the our world and will transform the future.

So much of the world has been made better with technology innovation and we are only in the middle ages where computers, nano, neuro, biotech have just been invented minutes ago in the long history of civilization.

We must meet the grand challenges of a Sustainable Planet–economic, social, security and environmental sustainability. Especially as were are looking at 9 billion by 2050.

This futurist calls for Planetary Management of food, water, security and energy. We need more Fast Innovation, Innovation Velocity for inventing the next future we will all be living in.

Bono reminded us, and he’s right. The Bay Area helped change the world with innovations like the computer, networks and biotech. Now we need to build on this culture everywhere.

Innovation Velocity means faster tech inventions by individuals, more investments by government and private sector, faster products to empower the next billion people to learn, grow, contribute, collaborate and do business.

How are you creating Innovation Velocity?

One world. One Challenge.

Apple’s Future Cloud Strategy: Learning from the Customer

Posted by Dr. James Canton on under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

Apple’s strategy with the cloud is to learn from their customers. No less important is to lay the foundation of interoperability with Apple TV, the Mac, iPad and Mobile Me. Mobile Me is a work in progress but is moving in the right direction.

As a former Apple executive I know that Apple envisions the future by learning from its customers. This is a powerful lesson that more of my clients could benefit from–learning from customers about how they see the future applications of their products.

Apple learns more from putting out products to customers and then mining their experiences. Apple TV is the latest. But the cloud is an attempt to integrate all of the other devices into one platform–an intuitive interoperable platform.

Already users of Apple’s iPad can stream wireless to the TV programs. What’s next the iCar? Yes. So the cloud for Apple is already in play for the next generation, its laying the foundation for the integration of not just devices like the iPhone but the integration of knowledge assets like video, music and data.

Who are you learning about the future from?

Emergent Self Organizing Smart Systems Drives Arab Spring

Posted by Dr. James Canton on April 23, 2011 under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

As the Arab Spring continues the real interesting back story is social media. If technology is the artifact of globalization and modernity then governments who are attempting to repress freedom should beware. Technology is a enabler of revolutions. Always has and always will.

This time the power to connect people, with real time communications is transformational as we have seen in the Middle East and North Africa. This is the beginning.

Social media like Twitter and Facebook are powerful social networking tools that combined with the 5 Billion cell phones on the planet are creating a new world wide broadcast channel for person to person communications. The organizers of the Arab Spring in now five nations in this region are using social media to connect, communicate and enable their revolutions.

Actual dates were published by organizers in Egypt and Libya calling for protests and organization. A mobile map with timelines was published via Twitter. This is a fundamental shift in the use of technology to influence even change the power structures of society.

The larger and perhaps amazing story is I think about the self-organizing systems that are playing out in the Arab Spring phenomena. As more nations go into turmoil and driven by the large majority of under 25 year old’s screaming for social change, the more we may see the workings of emergent systems that are connected, aligned and moving together. Some with their own mind.

Emergent self-organizing smart systems are new forms of technology enabled global networks that will transform the planet–some dark some light. Is this the Hive Mind at work? Or a quantum type of new organization mind at work evolving to meet the social needs of its inventors?

Stay tuned

Self organizing smart systems, social and political just like emerging computer networks have a collective unconscious Hive Mind at work. Smart Systems, intelligent evolving organizations of people, aligned around a similar ideology, across in this case nations in the Arab Spring Revolution are demonstrating via social networks like Twitter a new form of order and community. AI

Facebook Trend Propels Consumers and Business

Posted by Dr. James Canton on January 21, 2011 under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

Facebook is transforming consumers and business by offering a new dynamic marketing model where Attention and Community Rules. Not that Google and even newcomer GroupOn do not challenge the establishment of marketing, but Facebook’s fast adoption by consumers is leading the way.

Every organization should stand up and realize the Death of Marketing is here, that is traditional marketing. If you want to touch consumers, Facebook’s lessons about collaboration, birds of a feather, consumer to consumer advice and the de-personalization of technology–the digital community of virtual friends (even those you never met!) is forging a new marketing narrative.

GroupOn, Google, Facebook offer a glimpse of a future marketplace of the Mashup Economy that’s coming.

Stay tuned